Udala’m – part 1

How many independent parts can a beginner band handle? Two, maybe three at the most (established melody + bass line + counter melody). Surely not five! Yet that is exactly what Michael Story has achieved in his piece Udala’m – an arrangement of a Nigerian folk song. (You can view the full score here and find a recording here.)

Udala'm Ex 1.jpg

How does he do it?

  1. Pentatonic scale. This piece uses the Bb major pentatonic scale. The nice thing about a pentatonic scale is that there are no sharp dissonances. If fact, if you play all the scale degrees simultaneously as a cluster, you get a dense but consonant sound. This means that any note will basically work against any note, which in turn gives you a great deal of freedom when writing contrapuntal lines.
  2. Simple melodies. All instruments are playing in an easy range with no awkward or large leaps. Being pentatonic, the melodies are easily understood by the students. (Check out this video to see how easily people can understand a pentatonic scale.)
  3. Repetition. Each melodic figure is repeated. Once students have mastered their short phrase they can focus on playing that phrase, despite the distraction of the other independent lines.
  4. Staggered entries. He starts with the single melodic line (played by the flutes) and then adds a new melody every two bars (bar 3, 5, 7 and 9). This helps students to be able to understand what is going on and how the pieces “works”.
  5. Phrase Variation. If all the melodies were the same length and started on beat one of the bar, 5 independent layers would just turn into mush. Michael Story avoids this by varying the phrases length and the starting point as follows:
    1. Melody 1 – 2 bars, beginning on beat 1
    2. Melody 2 –  3 bars, beginning with a pickup note on beat 4
    3. Melody 3 – 2 bars, beginning on beat 2. Therefore, this melody crosses the bar line
    4. Melody 4 – 3 bars, beginning on beat 1
    5. Melody 5 – 3 bars, beginning and ending with a quarter rest. This melody doesn’t cross the bar line
  6. Effective orchestration. Each melodic line is given to a section that can play independently, regardless of the size of the band. There is nothing ground breaking about this orchestration, but is simple and effective.
    1. Flutes (+Oboes at bar 9)
    2. Low Woodwinds and Brass
    3. Clarinets
    4. Alto Saxes + Horns
    5. Trumpets

Once again, counterpoint is your friend – especially when writing for young bands. It can be a great way to create interest and complexity from simple elements that are easy to play and understand.

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  1. Udala’m – part 2 | Composing for Band - March 2, 2018

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